18-year-old Trevin M. Sanders has been charged with the 2011 murders of Robert and Colleen Grube. Above is a mugshot of Trevin Sanders from a March 2012 arrest on an unrelated theft charge. (Photo courtesty Randolph Co. Indiana Sheriff’s Department)
18-year-old Trevin M. Sanders has been charged with the 2011 murders of Robert and Colleen Grube. Above is a mugshot of Trevin Sanders from a March 2012 arrest on an unrelated theft charge. (Photo courtesty Randolph Co. Indiana Sheriff’s Department)
BY ED GEBERT

Times Bulletin Editor

egebert@timesbulletin.com

CELINA - An 18-year-old Union City, Ohio teen is facing 27 felony counts related to the home invasion murders of Robert and Colleen Grube of Fort Recovery in November 2011. Mercer County Sheriff Jeff Grey announced Wednesday morning that Trevin M. Sanders has been charged with the killings. Sanders is currently incarcerated at the prison in Michigan City, Indiana, serving a prison sentence on an unrelated theft charge.

A second person, 22-year-old Bryant L. Rhoades of Union City, Ohio, is being held in the Mercer County Jail for felony obstructing justice. The Mercer County Sheriff's Office claims Rhoades gave false information about the case to investigators.
On Nov. 30, 2011, the bodies of 79-year-old Robert Grube and his daughter, 47-year-old Colleen Grube were discovered in the home where they lived on Burrville Rd. near Fort Recovery. The pair had their hands bound with duct tape and were shot to death. The Grube family relayed through the Sheriff's Office that they would not be making any comment or statement at this point.

At a press conference Wednesday morning, Grey emphasized that the case had never gone cold in the 16 months since the murders. He also stated that the investigation is continuing. Investigators are still seeking at least one more suspect in the case.

"We will continue to follow up on tips on the tip line," vowed Grey. "I don't want people to just walk away and say, 'They've made an arrest, it's done, I don't need to give them the information.' We do want the information anybody has... I want to stress we're not done. We're still actively investigating the case. We want to make sure we get everyone who was involved."

According to Grey, his department received 88 tips via the phone tip line. Each of those tips were followed up by investigators. But even after the arrest of Sanders, the process is far from complete.

"Like I've said from the beginning," Grey stated, "It's only halftime right now. We've made an arrest, but the goal wasn't an arrest; the goal is a conviction."

During the investigation, authorities served 179 subpoenas and search warrants and conducted 329 interviews with 268 different people.

"During those interviews we were able to put people in that we were curious about, and looking through the information that we got from court orders and search warrants we were also able to eliminate some people," stated Grey.

Sanders faces multiple charges of aggravated murder, murder, involuntary manslaughter, kidnapping, aggravated robbery, aggravated burglary, and theft.

The case is more complicated since Sanders was 17 years old at the time of the murders. Grey noted that the case against Sanders will have to begin in juvenile court due to the suspect's age.

Efforts are in process to bring Sanders back to Mercer County. Rhoades was arrested Tuesday morning and appeared in court later that afternoon. He is being held on a $3.5 million bond with 10-percent privilege in the Mercer County Jail.

The investigation took a major turn in January 2012 when Grey received a call from the sheriff of Jay County, Indiana. Sheriff Ray Newton told Grey that he was suspicious of some people who had just been arrested and invited the Mercer County investigators to come examine the evidence. Soon Grey himself drove to Indiana to see, along with several members of the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation (BCI).

Grey said, "I'm going to say that was probably the turning point in the information that came out of that helped us start putting things together and getting us on the right track."

Grey was quick to credit those from his own staff who have been working the case over the last 16 months, as well as BCI agents and the U.S. Marshals Service.