Chase Eikenbary, Gov. Kasich’s liaison (center) meets with Dan Custis (second from left) of Advanced Biological Marketing in Van Wert. Pictured above are (from the left): Brad Custis, Dan Custis, Eikenbary, Van Wert Economic and Community Development Director Cindy Leis and , Curtis Gordon. (Photo submitted)
Chase Eikenbary, Gov. Kasich’s liaison (center) meets with Dan Custis (second from left) of Advanced Biological Marketing in Van Wert. Pictured above are (from the left): Brad Custis, Dan Custis, Eikenbary, Van Wert Economic and Community Development Director Cindy Leis and , Curtis Gordon. (Photo submitted)

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VAN WERT — With Governor John Kasich’s priority on new job creation, Chase Eikenbary, the NW Ohio Regional Liaison to Governor Kasich is making her way around northwest Ohio meeting with businesses to learn more about them and to express the Governor’s priority on new job creation.

Earlier this week, Chase visited National Door & Trim to tour the newly completed showroom expansion and Advance Biological Marketing (ABM) to learn about their growth and future plans in Van Wert. During the visit with ABM, company representatives shared that the company was founded by farmers, agronomists, and agricultural consultants dedicated to pushing the limits of technologies available to the agricultural community. ABM is focused on the farmer, both domestically and internationally, and dedicated to increasing the output and profitability of the land.

“Everything we do is in the best interest of the farmer,” stated ABM’s CEO, Dan Custis. “We understand that farmers not only provide food that feed the world, but their own families as well” As farmlands are passed from generation to generation, ABM is committed to offering sustainable solutions to the grower.

Currently, ABM is exporting their products to 15 countries and have plans to double that by 2015. With ABM’s products expected to increase yield production of rice, corn and wheat by 30 – 40 percent, developing countries are extremely interested in their product as are the U.S. farmers.